These reviews focus mainly on writing and gamebook mechanics with the intent to help authors. I'll use many examples from one or two playthroughs of each entry. While the 2015 competition offers worlds of imagination, character, and a trend toward story over numbers, it has also unleashed the most horrifying villain of all: English.
     English wants to kill and eat us, and we often want to change her to suit our spontaneous needs. But the average brain likes to read in certain ways. We prefer order over chaos, clarity over confusion, smoothness over messiness, and play over work. To tame English, we all walk somewhere on an endless path of learning. In fact, writing these reviews keeps me alert so I don't fall prey to English so much. Though quite pedantic in places, don't take these reviews too seriously. Sometimes I just like to play a game called How I Would Have Done It.

 
 
     A 16-year-old farmhand earns apprenticeship under Saimea, the town's alchemist with mild dementia.

 
 
     A divine, desert-faring warrior ruler living the high life gets more of the high life while sashaying on a revenge quest.

 
 
     A bounty hunter takes his captive across a western-fantasy frontier where they tumble into a murder mystery.

 
 
     In a world of mechanical lifeforms, a shapeshifting robot must stop an endless war and restore energy to the devastated landscape.

 
 
     A warrior, Qorc (probably pronounced Quark), discovers a sentient sword, and together they slaughter entire worlds of scumbags while questing for other parts of the demonically possessed battle gear.

 
 
     A robot explores an abandoned deep-sea science station to learn how to stop a crystal plague. 

 
 
     A morally questionable warrior must deal with the pesky narrator who wants the adventure to go a certain way.

 
 
     Using levitation and the deadly Care Bear Stare, Sir Issac Newton embarks to destroy counterfeiter William Chaloner and save the London economy.

 
 
     Australian activist Peter Lalor must survive his wartime injury and make something of himself with the help of magical household items.